Barnwell House of Tires Blog

Website Launch Announcement: Barnwell House of Tires Launches New Site

We are excited to announce the launch of our new website. The site features a fresh look, easy navigation and more focus on what the customer needs. The new site offers inventory listings with pictures and specs. You can search a variety of ways including: by vehicle and size. With the addition of our blog, we are able to help inform and educate our customers on important tire and service information. We invite you to visit our new website today.
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Reading Your Sidewall - Understanding Tire Hieroglyphics

Understanding Tire Hieroglyphics
There is a lot to learn from the sidewall of your tire. Although at first glance you may think you stumbled across tire hieroglyphics, you've actually found molded into the tires side its own user manual.

Tire Size
Example P205/55R16 91W

  • P identifies your tire as a Passenger Tire. The P stands for PMetric. If your tire size starts with LT rather than a P than it identifies the tire as a light truck tire.
  • 205 identifies the tire section width, which is the measurement of the tire from sidewall to sidewall in millimeters. This measurement varies depending on the rim to which it is fitted. (There are 25.4 millimeters per 1 inch.)
  • 55 is the two-figure aspect ratio. This percentage compares the tires section height with the tires section width. For example, this aspect ratio of 55 means that the tires section height is 55% of the tir ...
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History of the Passenger Tire

The Evolution of the Passenger Tire

Dateline 3500 B.C.--Today man invented the greatest invention ever seen, THE WHEEL! Thousands of years later, the wheel has come a long way. For one thing it is no longer made of wood and it is guaranteed that the ride is much smoother. What hasn't changed is the fact it is still one of man's greatest inventions. Could you even imagine where we would be today without it? The early wheel was very simple...a solid curved piece of wood, then leather was eventually added to soften the ride, as time progressed it became solid rubber which led to today's tire--the pneumatic, or air inflated, radial tire. The first wheels made of metal or wood were very durable but did not provide a very comfortable ride. The nearest thing to the first tire was a metal hoop. There were many individuals that made contributions in creating the tire as we think of it today.

Vulcanization and Charles G ...

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Driving Tips for Winter

Problems always seem to happen at the most inconvenient times. Sufficient planning and preparation can make the difference between a minor inconvenience and a potentially dangerous situation. The leading cause of death during winter storms is auto accidents. Below are preventative tips to keep you safe on the road this winter. You may not be able to control Mother Nature but using caution and common sense can prevent an accident.

  • Always know the weather before you get on the road. Remember to be extra careful when driving on bridges and overpasses; they are the first to freeze over. Be aware of black ice. Black ice occurs when the road appears to be dry but is darker and shinier than usual. Slow down when driving through these areas.
  • Always Buckle Up! 
  • Slow Down (this includes turning, braking, stopping and accelerating).
  • Stay Alert. Make sure ...
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How to Build a Radial Tire.

How to build a radial tire.

Tires are not just round and black they are sophisticated products that can take years of research and development to produce. If you have ever wondered how tires are made, the following is a road map for the construction of a radial tire:

Start with Rubber and Additives

Tire construction starts when raw chemical additives such as sulfur, carbon black and solvents are combined with natural and synthetic rubber. The process takes place in a large machine called a Banbury. In addition to mixing and grinding, the Banbury heats the rubber to make it workable in preparation for further applications. The raw product emerges in the form of long, flat bands of rubber, which are then worked in rolling mills.

 

Six Main Components

It takes several machines to shape the rubber into the individual components of the tire: tread, ply, belts, bea ...

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